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Families' page

Having a loved one in Intensive Care can be an incredibly stressful and upsetting time for families and friends.It can be difficult to think straight when you feel like your whole life has been turned upside down, often without warning. In this section, we've provided some very general information and advice on things like what to expect when visiting the Intensive Care Unit (for the first time), how to make sure you and your family are kept up to date and how to look after yourself. We've also provided some information and advice on practical issues such as taking time off work and money and legal issues.

Sadly, some patients don't survive their illness.We have also provided what we hope is some useful information and advice on some of the things you need to do if you lose a loved one.We have also provided to some links to organisations who can provide you with emotional support.We are very sorry for your loss.

 

 

 

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Article: Feedback from other families about Intensive Care at the Royal Infirmary

Knowing that your family member or friend is receiving the very best of care can be really reassuring. Here are some of the things that other family members have told us about the care their loved one received on our Intensive Care Unit. The staff "The staff were amazing,so kind, caring and attentive" "We were very impressed with the care and attention given to us as relatives" "In spite of this being a very difficult situation, I feel very reassured...

Web Link: Healthtalkonline - families' experiences of Intensive Care

This link will take you to the Healthtalkonline website. You can hear about other family members' and close friends' experiences of having a loved one in Intensive Care. There are short videos, voice recordings and written interviews, which we hope you find useful.

Web Link: If someone dies: bereavement support

Sadly, not everyone survives Intensive Care. We are very sorry for your loss.This is the link to Cruse Bereavement Care. They are able to provide free advice or one-to-one counselling sessions.

Web Link: If someone dies: bereavement support for children

We're very sorry for your loss. This link will take you to the website of childbereavement uk. They are a UK-wide organisation who can help support families with children and young adults, when there is a death in the family. They provide a free confidential Helpline, staffed by trained professionals, face-to-face support (in some areas), and helpful leaflets that you can download or print off. Please see their website to find out more.

Web Link: If someone dies: registering a death in Scotland

Sadly,not everyone survives Intensive Care. We are very sorry for your loss. This link takes you to the website of the General Register Office for Scotland.It provides information on how to register a death in Scotland.

External Video: Insight into ICU (a short video)

This links to a 20 minute webcast by staff and former patients from the Intensive Care Unit at the Royal Berkshire Hospital.It provides some interesting and useful insights into what happens in Intensive Care. Several patients share their experiences of their time there.While we are not currently able to offer some of the services provided in this webcast, we hope you find it useful.

Document: Intensive Care - A guide for patients and families

This is a booklet written by ICUSteps, which is a charity developed by former Intensive Care patients, family members and healthcare staff. It was written by patients and families for patients and families and is very easy to read.

Article: Keeping up to date

Who can I ask about my loved one's condition? The nurse who is looking after your family member will have a very clear understanding of your loved one's condition. She/he will be able to explain things to you in easily understandable language and will be happy to answer any questions you might have. We do understand that visiting a loved one in Intensive Care can be very upsetting and that it can sometimes be difficult to remember what you've been told.Please...

Article: Looking after yourself

Having a loved one in Intensive Care can be emotionally and physically exhausting. It can be all too easy to forget to take care of yourself. Try to remember, though, that you will need all your strength to help look after your loved one when he/she gets out of hospital. Try to keep to as normal a routine as you can It's completely understandable to feel that you want to "be there", to stay as close to your loved one as possible, either at their bedside, in the...